technology

Former Facebook exec paints a grim picture of where the US will be in 30 years – MarketWatch

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An interesting thought.

Source: Former Facebook exec paints a grim picture of where the US will be in 30 years – MarketWatch

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Acxiom, the Quiet Giant of Consumer Database Marketing | NYTimes.com

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Acxiom, the Quiet Giant of Consumer Database Marketing | NYTimes.com.

This is extremely upsetting.

You should be as outraged as I am.

“Few consumers have ever heard of Acxiom. But analysts say it has amassed the world’s largest commercial database on consumers — and that it wants to know much, much more. Its servers process more than 50 trillion data “transactions” a year. Company executives have said its database contains information about 500 million active consumers worldwide, with about 1,500 data points per person. That includes a majority of adults in the United States.”

[…]

“Privacy advocates say they are more troubled by data brokers’ ranking systems, which classify some people as high-value prospects, to be offered marketing deals and discounts regularly, while dismissing others as low-value — known in industry slang as “waste.” Exclusion from a vacation offer may not matter much, says Pam Dixon, the executive director of the World Privacy Forum, a nonprofit group in San Diego, but if marketing algorithms judge certain people as not worthy of receiving promotions for higher education or health services, they could have a serious impact. “Over time, that can really turn into a mountain of pathways not offered, not seen and not known about,” Ms. Dixon says.”

The Teen Porn Epidemic…and what to do about it | Catholic Exchange

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The Teen Porn Epidemic…and what to do about it | Catholic Exchange.

“When Nathan started using internet pornography, he found that over time it somehow got less and less exciting. His daily routine soon included hours spent consuming porn, yet he had grown “almost numb to it,” he recalls. Like many men with addictions, he was discovering that the compulsive use of porn dulls the pleasure receptors of the brain, forcing them to seek ever-greater amounts of stimulation in a desperate quest for sexual satisfaction.

But Nathan was not yet a man. He was just twelve years old.”

Read the article for more information.

32 Innovations [WORTH READING] That Will Change Your Tomorrow | NYTimes.com

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32 Innovations That Will Change Your Tomorrow – Interactive Feature – NYTimes.com.

My favorite:

“When you aim the SpeechJammer at someone, it records that person’s voice and plays it back to him with a delay of a few hundred milliseconds. This seems to gum up the brain’s cognitive processes — a phenomenon known as delayed auditory feedback — and can painlessly render the person unable to speak. Kazutaka Kurihara, one of the SpeechJammer’s creators, sees it as a tool to prevent loudmouths from overtaking meetings and public forums, and he’d like to miniaturize his invention so that it can be built into cellphones. “It’s different from conventional weapons such as samurai swords,” Kurihara says. “We hope it will build a more peaceful world.” (Catherine Rampell)”

Hahahahaha.. “The Shut Up Gun”…. hahahahahaha

 

I just might like the future 😉

Woman recounts 11 year-old son’s nightmare addiction to Internet porn | LifeSiteNews.com

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Woman recounts 11 year-old son’s nightmare addiction to Internet porn | LifeSiteNews.com.

Charlie’s mother wrote that she broke down the day she discovered the words “I am disgusting” written on the inside of his arm. She was shocked to learn the cause of her son’s personality change was pornography addiction, not drugs or drinking.

“An 11-year-old boy with no credit card had been able to access websites that presented every possible kind of perversion. Today’s pornography is vile beyond description,” she wrote. Scenes of violence, sadism, degradation of women and child abuse were common among the material stored on Charlie’s computer.

A major problem on many levels.

1) The child should not have had unfettered access to the internet.

2) The mother should have monitored her child’s online activity.

3) The parental blocks on the computer should have been on and stringent.

And as a side note, as tragic as this is, the mother cannot blame the government for her son’s pornography addiction.  They may have contributed to his ability to view it, but initial access was granted only when she put a computer in his room.