childhood

Rupert Everett, Openly Gay Actor: “Children Need a Mother and Father” | NOM Blog

Posted on

Gay Movie Icon: Children Need a Mother and Father | NOM Blog.

Kudos to you, Mr. Everett.

“The star of the 1998 film Shakespeare in Love blazed a trail for gay actors when he came out as homosexual 20 years ago.

However, he has been criticised by gay rights groups after giving an interview in which he decried same-sex couples who have children.

The 53-year-old told the Sunday Times Magazine that his mother Sara had met his boyfriend but “still wishes I had a wife and kids.”

“She thinks children need a father and a mother and I agree with her,” he said. “I can’t think of anything worse than being brought up by two gay dads.

“Some people might not agree with that. Fine! That’s just my opinion. — The UK Telegraph”

How to raise boys without the swagger | All Abroad Baby

Posted on

How to raise boys without the swagger – All Abroad Baby.

Awesome report on a book I’m now inclined to read for myself; “Swagger” by Lisa Bloom, and 7 ways to raise high-achieving, well-read, intellectually stimulated boys in this world of pandering screens and video games.

Noteworthy quote:

“As Lisa Bloom states: ‘If a violent criminal knocked on your front door and said he’d like some time alone with your son to sing some catchy and slickly packaged songs he’d written about life on the streets and behind bars, would you give him ten bucks, show him to your son’s room, and leave the two of them alone for hours, unmonitored?’

This paraphrase from the third chapter of Swagger kept me reading. It made me laugh and, at the same time, had me thinking ‘You couldn’t have put it any better’. Before this I wasn’t sure if I was going to finish reading Swagger. This is because it starts out with an alarming bunch of statistics and research into how girls are outperforming boys at every level of school, in every subject.

Boys are being kicked out of preschool at four times the rate of girls and girls dominate the top 10 percent of the class, while boys crowd the bottom 10 percent.

“What should I tell my kids about sex?” | Simcha Fisher

Posted on

“What should I tell my kids about sex?” | Simcha Fisher.

Most important parts:
“There is so much here that one thing is clear: there is no such thing as The Talk, singular.”

“This education has to begin at an early age, in an age-appropriate way. One reader sums it up this way: “5-year-olds need to understand what modesty is, and why our bodies need to be given an appropriate amount of respect. 7-year-olds need to be able to ask questions (and get answers) when they see “weird” magazine covers at the grocery store. 10-year-olds need to have some understanding of their biology. And so on. I don’t think there is an age that is too early to plant the seeds of modesty, purity, and chastity because it involves so much more than [sexual intercourse]. It is ultimately ordered to charity and the basic understanding that all people are created in the image and likeness of God.””

The whole article is worth the read.

Better dead than disabled? The insanity of that $4.5 million ‘wrongful birth’ case | LifeSiteNews.com

Posted on

Better dead than disabled? The insanity of that $4.5 million ‘wrongful birth’ case | LifeSiteNews.com.

“The fact that a sitting judge would recognize the preposterous notion of “wrongful birth” — stop for a minute and consider the implications of that statement — makes it crystal clear that some people, based on their ability, should not have been permitted to be born. If you are missing a limb, or have a mental disability, or are somehow not as perfectly formed as society-at-large thinks you should be, you have essentially been “wrongfully born.” Your right to life is contingent upon how useful you are to society. Hitler’s T-4 Euthanasia program, apparently, was denounced because it was simply too cutting edge for the 1940s. … Abortion advocates accuse us of a slippery slope fallacy when we state that abortion, which fundamentally reduces the value of human life and makes it contingent upon characteristics other than humanity, leads to eugenics, gendercide, and the culling of the weak. When we have 100 million missing baby girls in China, I think we are stating facts. When we point out that the womb has become the new killing fields for disabled children, I think the statistics are undeniable. And when a judge awards two people $4.5 million dollars for “wrongful birth” because they couldn’t butcher their child in time, I think society has, in a very fundamental sense, stopped denying our claims altogether.”

There is truth in his words.  Read the whole article for a story he illustrates his point with.

Again, like I said in the previous post, the precedence this judicial ruling sets for the rest of time ….. scares me.  It truly scares me.

 

Couple who would have aborted disabled son awarded $4.5 million for ‘wrongful birth’ | LifeSiteNews.com

Posted on

Couple who would have aborted disabled son awarded $4.5 million for ‘wrongful birth’ | LifeSiteNews.com.

This is such a strange story.

How can anyone say to their child, “If we had known what you were going to be like before you were born, we would have aborted you.” ?

It sounds like they are using the money to make his life better, which may be the only good to come out of something like this. $4.5 million is an awful lot of money.

The fact that the case has been heard and ruled with a verdict though sets all kinds of precedence that is going to lead to more horrible things down the road ….

Where is this country going?

Homeschooling Magnifies Family Problems (and That s a Good Thing) | Blogs | NCRegister.com

Posted on

Homeschooling Magnifies Family Problems (and That s a Good Thing) | Blogs | NCRegister.com.

Another great article from Jennifer Fulwiler.

Some excellent points are made.

“Homeschooling isn’t for everyone. There are a lot of reasons a family might choose a different model of education, but I’ve come to think that a bad dynamic between parents and kids shouldn’t be one of them. I used to think that those daily battles of wills were a bug in the homeschooling system; now I see them as a feature. Homeschooling acts as a magnifying glass, enlarging your view of any cracks that run through the foundation of your family, thus allowing you to address them before they grow larger and deeper.”