euthanasia

Killing Newborn Babies No Different To Abortion | Huffington Post

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Killing Newborn Babies No Different To Abortion | Huffington Post.

The ‘After-birth abortion: why should the baby live?’ paper argues that the act wouldn’t be classed as euthanasia because the best interest of the foetus or newborn being killed is not necessarily the primary reason his or her life is being terminated. The authors state that after-birth abortion should be made legal and it should be permitted on the same grounds as abortion. They added that it wouldn’t be the same as infanticide.”

…. Are you reading this?  Can you believe what they just said?

It “wouldn’t be euthanasia” because they are not seeking the best interest of the newborn being killed. OBVIOUSLY.

Are you reading this?!?!?!

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[Why the] Catholic bishops strike back | Washington Times

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Catholic bishops strike back | Washington Times.

“Why go to battle with the Catholic Church? The answer may lie beyond the current fray. So much of what the Catholic Church stands for is antithetical to so many positions of Mr. Obama and his core supporters (think abortion, embryo-destructive research, same-sex marriage). Perhaps, at bottom, this is no more than a power play. Take the Catholic Church down a notch now and make future battles easier later.”

Love this op-ed piece speculating the real reason for the HHS mandate.

Hate the fact that she’s probably right.

Planned Parenthood Celebration Jolted by Abortion Survivor

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Planned Parenthood Celebration Jolted by Abortion Survivor.

Chills.  I have chills.

“Members, I would like to introduce you to a new friend and hero of mine — her name is Gianna Jessen. She is visiting us today from Nashville, Tennessee, where she is an accomplished recording artist.
“She has cerebral palsy and was raised in foster homes before being adopted at the age of four.

“She was born prematurely and weighed only 2 pounds at birth. She remained in the hospital for almost three months. A doctor once said she had a great will to live and that she fought for her life. Eventually she was able to leave the hospital and be placed in foster care.

“Because of her cerebral palsy, her foster mother was told that it was doubtful that she would ever crawl or walk. She could not sit up independently. Through the prayers and dedication of her foster mother, she eventually learned to sit up, crawl, then stand. Shortly before her fourth birthday, she began to walk with leg braces and a walker.

“She continued in physical therapy and after a total of four surgeries, she was able to walk without assistance.

“She still falls sometimes, but she says she has learned how to fall gracefully after falling for 29 years.

“Two years ago, she walked into a local health club and said she wanted a private trainer. At the time her legs could not lift 30 pounds. Today she can leg press 200 pounds.

“She became so physically fit that she began running marathons to raise money and awareness for cerebral palsy. She just returned last week from England where she ran in the London Marathon. It took her more than eight-and-a-half hours to complete. They were taking down the course by the time she made it to the finish line. But she made it, nonetheless. With bloody feet and aching joints, she finished the race.

“Members would you help me recognize a modern-day hero — Gianna Jessen?”

What if Catholic bishops aren’t bluffing? | Hot Air

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What if Catholic bishops aren’t bluffing? | Hot Air.

A very, very important article.  If this goes through, the Bishops have already said every Catholic hospital will close in the United States.  That’s over 120,000 hospital beds, gone.  Over a half-million jobs, gone.

The Catholic Church has perhaps the most extensive private health-care delivery system in the nation. It operates 12.6 percent of hospitals in the U.S., according to the Catholic Health Association of the U.S., accounting for 15.6 percent of all admissions and 14.5 percent of all hospital expenses, a total for Catholic hospitals in 2010 of $98.6 billion. Whom do these hospitals serve? Catholic hospitals handle more than their share of Medicare (16.6 percent) and Medicaid (13.65) discharges, meaning that more than one in six seniors and disabled patients get attention from these hospitals, and more than one in every eight low-income patients as well. Almost a third (32 percent) of these hospitals are located in rural areas, where patients usually have few other options for care.

Compared to their competition, Catholic hospitals take a leading role in providing less-profitable services to patients. They lead the sector in breast cancer screenings, nutrition programs, trauma, geriatric services, and social work. In most of these areas, other non-profits come close, but hospitals run by state and local governments fall significantly off the pace. Where patients have trouble paying for care, Catholic hospitals cover more of the costs. For instance, Catholic Health Services in Florida provides free care to families below 200 percent of federal poverty line, accepting Medicaid reimbursements as payment in full, and caps costs at 20 percent of household income for families that fall between 200 percent and 400 percent of the federal poverty line.

Imagine the impact if these hospitals shut down, discounting the other 400-plus health centers and 1,500 specialized homes that the Catholic Church operates as part of its mission that would also disappear. Thanks to the economic models of these hospitals, no one will rush to buy them. One in six patients in the current system would have to vie for service in the remaining system, which would have to absorb almost $100 billion in costs each year to treat them. Over 120,000 beds would disappear from an already-stressed system.

The poor and working class families that get assistance from Catholic benefactors would end up having to pay more for their care than they do under the current system. Rural patients would have to travel farther for medical care, and services like social work and breast-cancer screenings would fall to the less-efficient government-run institutions. That would not only impact the poor and working class patients, but would create much longer wait times for everyone else in the system. Finally, over a half-million people employed by Catholic hospitals now would lose their jobs almost overnight, which would have a big impact on the economy as well as on health care.”

Over birth control.

That’s how important this issue is to us.

 

Like the original author said: “Don’t count on the bishops to blink first.”

Too Many People? Ignore the UNPFA and Welcome Baby 7 Billion | NCRegister.com

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Too Many People? Ignore the UNPFA and Welcome Baby 7 Billion |  NCRegister.com.

“The UNFPA believes the world is already overpopulated. It even applauds China’s one-child policy, believing that the Chinese Communist Party got it exactly right by limiting most couples to one child. In fact, it actively seeks to encourage other countries to similarly limit their childbearing and turns a blind eye to the human-rights abuses that result.”

“If we really were “breeding ourselves off the face of the planet,” as the other side likes to claim, mortality rates would be climbing and life spans would be shrinking. Instead, we see the opposite.”

An extremely thought-provoking answer to the recent Economist article saying the exact opposite: that Baby 7 billion means birth-control isn’t doing it’s job.

World population: Now we are seven billion | The Economist.

Low birth rates a threat to economy, study shows

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Low birth rates a threat to economy, study shows | Catholic Register

““In advanced economies, citizens no longer must have children and raise them successfully in order to secure support in old age,” the study says. “Instead, the elderly in developed countries have largely been able to rely on health and retirement benefits paid for by other peoples’ children: that is, working-age adults who are currently paying the taxes for public pensions.”

But as the birth rates fall, the study shows, there will be fewer and fewer of these workers to support the needs of a growing cohort of retiring seniors.”

 

Ah, how people only pay attention when it has to do with their money.

Yes, this is a problem.  Late to the discussion, much, rest of the world?